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Economic Development

"Over and over again, you’ve heard me say that our defining goal as a community is to make Somerville a great place to live, work, play and raise a family. But, for almost all of us, the achievement of that goal begins with the “work:” Without a decent job, the living, playing and raising-a-family parts are pretty hard to pull off. That’s why we’ve created the Somerville Jobs Advisory Committee, and why I look forward to working closely with them in the coming year to develop strategies that match local jobs to local workers in ways that benefit not only employer and employee, but the entire community. 4.5 percent unemployment is pretty good – but I’d like us to do even better."  ~ Joe Curtatone


 

Joe On the Record:

All about jobs | by Joe Curtatone, Somerville News (Op-Ed), 3/9/2012

Over and over again, you’ve heard me say that our defining goal as a community is to make Somerville a great place to live, work, play and raise a family. But, for almost all of us, the achievement of that goal begins with the “work:” Without a decent job, the living, playing and raising-a-family parts are pretty hard to pull off. That’s why we’ve created the Somerville Jobs Advisory Committee, and why I look forward to working closely with them in the coming year to develop strategies that match local jobs to local workers in ways that benefit not only employer and employee, but the entire community. 4.5 percent unemployment is pretty good – but I’d like us to do even better.

 

An annual report to the business community | by Joe Curtatone, Somerville News (Op-Ed), 4/20/2012

It’s easy to see how … various factors – mixed use, multiple transportation options, daytime employers supporting a round-the-clock shopping and entertainment district while generating demand for convenient housing – all come together in a place like Assembly Square, where we’re building from the ground up. But the same basic ingredients are the cornerstone of any successful urban community.

Still, it’s important to remember that one size doesn’t fit all: one of the great things about Somerville is that its commercial squares and districts are as diverse as its people. I don’t expect to see uniform character, density, or function from one commercial area to another, but I am confident that, applied in varying proportions to various locations, these tried-and-true components of urban economic development will continue to lift the city as a whole.

Over the past few months, I‘ve talked in this column about some of the new initiatives we’ve taken to improve our long-term business climate: our new Transportation Research, Analysis and Planning (TRIP) Team; our Jobs Advisory Committee — and even our quality of life initiatives like the Mayor’s Fitness Challenge and our exploration of the potential for urban agriculture. All of these ventures draw on the participation and wisdom of our entire community – and all of them have the potential to enrich our shared economic life.

There are many reasons why it’s a good time to be in business in Somerville. But perhaps the best reason is that we’re not going to get complacent or stand pat: our renaissance is just getting started, and we will keep experimenting and innovating so that our city, and our economy, never get old.